GLASGOW  Colin Reader: Saqqara - secrets of the sands
Dec
1
1:45 PM13:45

GLASGOW Colin Reader: Saqqara - secrets of the sands

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Ian Mathieson Memorial Lecture

Saqqara - secrets of the sands

As an engineering geologist, Colin Reader was first attracted to Ancient Egypt as a result of the controversy over the age of the Great Sphinx at Giza and what the weathering and erosion of that monument could tell us about its age.  Although some of his ideas on the Early Dynastic origins of the Sphinx are controversial, they have received some support (being published in Archaeometry (Oxford University) and elsewhere) and have featured in a number of TV documentaries. Colin's initial interest in the Sphinx has led him to research wider issues associated with the geology of Egypt, looking particularly at the way the Egyptian landmass and features such as the Nile and the Red Sea Hills, evolved.  Colin was invited by Ian Mathieson to join the Saqqara Geophysical Survey Project as a geologist, and spent four years mapping the site. This lecture is based on a reassessment of features at Saqqara.  After initially examining the origins of the causeway in Egyptian pyramid complexes, a much broader question arises: what did Saqqara look like in the dynasties before the Step Pyramid was built?

Colin worked at Saqqara with Ian Mathieson on the Saqqara Geophysical Survey Project. Egyptology Scotland dedicate a lecture each year to Ian's memory, in recognition of his support for the society and his contribution to Scottish Egyptology. Find out more about Ian at:
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/technology-obituaries/7880008/Ian-Mathieson.html
 

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EDINBURGH  Zsuzsanna Végh: Peker and Arek-Heh - the burial places of Osiris in Abydos
Nov
3
2:30 PM14:30

EDINBURGH Zsuzsanna Végh: Peker and Arek-Heh - the burial places of Osiris in Abydos

In Predynastic and Early Dynastic times, the Upper Egyptian city of Abydos served as a royal burial place. Around 500 years later, towards the end of the Old Kingdom, one of the royal tombs became identified as the tomb of the god Osiris, the ruler of the netherworld. From the beginning of the Middle Kingdom, a huge festival was celebrated here in honour of Osiris, which counted as one of the most important religious celebrations until Roman times. In the centre of this festival stood a procession connecting the Osiris-temple at the edge of the cultivated area with the area of the royal tombs in the desert.  Over the centuries, however, the structure of the festival changed significantly. The aim of the talk is to give a general overview of the evolution of the Abydene cult practices from the Middle Kingdom until Roman times, while examining the written references to the Abydene burial place of Osiris. With which Abydene areas can the various toponyms (most notably Peker and Arek-Heh) be identified? How are these areas interconnected and finally, how many tombs did Osiris have in Abydos?

Dr Zsuzsanna Végh is a postdoctoral researcher in the Institut für Ägyptologie und Koptologie, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München.

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GLASGOW Mohamed Kenawi: Metelis - the discovery of an ancient town
Oct
6
1:45 PM13:45

GLASGOW Mohamed Kenawi: Metelis - the discovery of an ancient town

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Metelis from Late Dynastic to Early Islamic Periods: the discovery of an ancient town

The Italian project, directed by C. Mondin, M. Asolati, and M. Kenawi, focuses on the investigation of two inter-connected archaeological sites in the Beheira region. Excavations at the two sites in the Western Nile Delta have indicated that this area would have once been well-connected and suitable for significant levels of commerce and trade.

The project aims to study and preserve the two sites of Kom al-Ahmer and Kom Wasit in Beheira Province. Since 2012, the international team is working side by side with Egyptian colleagues in order to have better understanding of the region. The investigation focused on the mudbrick enclosure wall of the Late Dynastic temple, where several amulets of different gods, 7th century BC Greek pottery and bronze cobras statutes were recovered. Two early Hellenistic houses have been fully excavated and the material culture recovered provides insight on the statue and religious beliefs of its occupiers. a tholos bath complex and later re-usage as a necropolis were uncovered. Finds and structures are belonging to the remains of a large scale size town that was probably a hub for different other sites around.

DR MOHAMED KENAWI was Head Researcher (2011–16), followed by Acting Director (2016–17), of the Hellenistic Centre of Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Alexandria. He taught at the American University in Cairo and at Catania University. He has participated in various archaeological missions in Libya, Italy, and Egypt, among them those at Kom al-Ahmer/Kom Wasit, Athribis, and Dionysias. He currently collaborates on projects with Padua University, the City University of New York, and Tübingen University. At present, he is a Researcher and Training Manager at the School of Archaeology, University of Oxford, for the Endangered Archaeology of the Middle East and North Africa project. He has published many articles about his research in the Delta and Fayoum, in addition to his monograph, Alexandria’s Hinterland: Archaeology of the Western Nile Delta, Egypt (2014). His most recent publication (with Giorgia Marchiori) is 'Unearthing Alexandria's Archaeology: The Italian Contribution' (2018).

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GLASGOW Paul Collins: Egypt's Origins - A View from Iran and Mesopotamia / Egypt and the Assyrian Empire
Jun
23
1:45 PM13:45

GLASGOW Paul Collins: Egypt's Origins - A View from Iran and Mesopotamia / Egypt and the Assyrian Empire

Summer double lecture.

Egypt's Origins: A view from Iran and Mesopotamia

The significance of cultural borrowings from Mesopotamia and Elam in the formation of the Egyptian state during the period 3500-2900 BC has long been debated. This talk will explore the evidence from Syria, Iraq and Iran for the emergence of cities, trade routes and associated technology and art that provides the wider context for the emergence of Egyptian kingship.

Egypt and the Assyrian Empire

The relations between Egypt and the kingdom of Assyria in northern Mesopotamia can be traced in some detail between approximately 1300 and 600 BC. The splendour of Egypt’s New Kingdom empire helped to shape the identity of Assyria as its armies expanded across the Near East, ultimately invading Egypt to confront the rulers of the 25th Dynasty. This is a story that can be reconstructed from both texts and imagery to present a compelling story of interaction between the two great powers of the 1st millennium BC.

 

Dr Paul Collins is currently the Jaleh Hearn Curator for Ancient Near East at the Ashmolean Museum. After reading Ancient History at UCL, he worked at the British Museum before returning to UCL to complete a doctorate in the archaeology of Mesopotamia. In 2001 he joined the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Department of Ancient Near Eastern Art and co-curated a major exhibition, ‘Art of the First Cities’. From 2006-11, he worked in the Middle East Department at the British Museum as curator of Mesopotamia and was the lead curator for a consultancy project to establish a national museum in Abu Dhabi, before joining the Ashmolean in 2011. His publications include From Egypt to Babylon: The International Age 1550-500 BC (2008), Discovering Tutankhamun (2014) and Mountains and Lowlands: Ancient Iran and Mesopotamia (2016), and he currently serves as Chair of the British Institute for Iraq.

 

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GLASGOW Averil Anderson: The Collectors and the Collection of Ancient Egypt in Dundee
May
19
1:45 PM13:45

GLASGOW Averil Anderson: The Collectors and the Collection of Ancient Egypt in Dundee

Dundee's McManus Art Gallery & Museum has just celebrated its 150th anniversary, when it opened as The Albert Institute for Science and Literature and the Victoria Galleries, Dundee's original V&A, in 1867. The Egyptian collection has always been an integral part of the museum and was started shortly after its opening. Come along and hear about the donors - The Egypt Exploration Fund, Rev. Colin Campbell and Sir James Caird amongst others - and the Egyptian collection over this 150 year period, its objects, rediscoveries and research.

Having had a fascination with all things Egyptian since watching John Romer's 'Ancient Egyptians', in 2007 Averil decided to take her interest further by taking the Certificate and then the Diploma in Egyptology at the University of Manchester. This in turn led to her becoming a volunteer at the McManus Art Galleries & Museum in 2011 where she has been researching the Egyptology Collection, working with the curators, conservator and collection. 

 

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EDINBURGH Margaret Maitland: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Egyptian Art from the Collections of National Museums Scotland
Apr
14
2:30 PM14:30

EDINBURGH Margaret Maitland: Tradition and Innovation in Ancient Egyptian Art from the Collections of National Museums Scotland

Ancient Egyptian art is often seen by modern viewers as flat, static, and formal, compared to more 'naturalistic' ancient Greek and later European art. However, the conventions of the Egyptian artistic style successfully served their purpose: art was a form of visual language, in which clear communication was more important than realism. This talk will explore works of ancient Egyptian art in the collections of National Museums Scotland to examine the importance of tradition in an artistic style that lasted thousands of years, as well as the creative ways in which craftsmen and artists innovated within that system and incorporated external cultural influences. 

Dr Margaret Maitland is senior curator of the Ancient Mediterranean collections at the National Museum of Scotland.

 

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GLASGOW Judit Blair: Set and Satan
Mar
17
1:45 PM13:45

GLASGOW Judit Blair: Set and Satan

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It is generally accepted by scholars that many ancient mythological traditions have found their way into Christianity and later times. As there have been many connections between ancient Egypt and ancient Israel throughout history, it is possible to explore similarities between Egyptian religion and Biblical religion.  Indeed, many Egyptologists in the 19th century were mainly concerned with discovering cultural records and thus evidence for certain biblical events.

This talk focuses on the development of the characters of Satan and Set, without intending to prove or disprove the the historicity of Biblical events or characters.

Dr Judit Blair studied as an undergraduate in Romania and received a BSc in Mathematics and a BA in Theology, before going on to the University of Edinburgh, where she studied for MTh in Ancient Near Eastern Studies and a PhD in Hebrew and Old Testament entitled De-Demonising the Old Testament (published by Mohr Siebeck in 2009). Judit worked as a Teaching Assistant at New College, Edinburgh University, tutoring courses such as Religion (ANE, Judaism, Christianity and Islam as well as Eastern Religions), Biblical Studies and Hebrew. She has worked as a secondary teacher of Mathematics and Religious Studies and has been lecturing at the University of Edinburgh Centre for Open Learning since 2014 (Myths, Monarchs and Monuments of Ancient Egypt) and from February this year also at Glasgow University Short Courses (Aspects of Ancient Near Eastern Demonology and Egypt and the Bible).

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EDINBURGH Joanne Rowland: The Discovery and Rediscovery of Merimde Beni Salama from the Middle Palaeolithic until 2017
Feb
17
2:30 PM14:30

EDINBURGH Joanne Rowland: The Discovery and Rediscovery of Merimde Beni Salama from the Middle Palaeolithic until 2017

This lecture focuses on research at the prehistoric settlement site of Merimde Beni Salama along the western Nile Delta fringes. The site was discovered in the late 1920s during the Austrian West Delta Expedition, but has also been investigated by Egyptian, German, and most recently British projects, each with a particular aim, and very much of their time.  The talk also explores how the Neolithic settlers at the site rediscovered the earlier Palaeolithic activity.

Dr Joanne Rowland is a lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh.

 

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**RESCHEDULED** GLASGOW Carlos Gracia Zamacona : A New Approach to the Coffin Texts
Feb
3
1:45 PM13:45

**RESCHEDULED** GLASGOW Carlos Gracia Zamacona : A New Approach to the Coffin Texts

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Dr Carlos Gracia Zamacona is an honorary research associate at the École Pratique des Hautes Études, and obtained his PhD in Egyptology in 2008 with a thesis on the semantics of Ancient Egyptian (motion verbs in the Coffin Texts) under the direction of Pascal Vernus. He has been awarded research fellowships at the Academia de España in Rome and at the Institut Français d’Archéologie Orientale in Cairo.

His interests are verbal semantics, metaphorical thinking, textual patterns and uses, writing and its connections to language and semiotics, and religious thought and its reinterpretation.

He has taught Egyptology at the University of Barcelona, and seminars at the Archaeological National Museum in Madrid, and has collaborated as a researcher in research projects such as the Giza Project (Harvard University, 2015-2016) and the Diana Arcaizante Project (Universidad Complutense & Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando, Madrid, 2007-2013).

Please note that this lecture will be preceded by the Society AGM.

This meeting has been rescheduled from 20th January.

 

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GLASGOW Robert Demarée: Some Insights into Ancient Egyptian Writings
Dec
2
1:45 PM13:45

GLASGOW Robert Demarée: Some Insights into Ancient Egyptian Writings

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Ian Mathieson Memorial Lecture 2017

This lecture will present an overview of what we think we know about humour and sadness in Ancient Egypt, followed by the story of a discovery in the Vienna Museum a few years ago - an ibis mummy jar which also contained a much older small papyrus scroll. 

Dr Robert Demarée studied Egyptology at the Universities of Leiden, Copenhagen, Oxford and Amsterdam, and was assistant curator at the Museum of Antiquities, Leiden from 1958-1962. Afterwards, he worked as a publisher for many years. He has been a lecturer at Leiden University since 1984, specializing in the hieratic script and in the socio-economic history of the New Kingdom, notably of the inhabitants of Deir el-Medina. He is currently working on the publication of hieratic papyri in Turin, ostraca in London, Cairo, Brussels and several other collections, and graffiti from several sites in Egypt, such as Thebes, Saqqara, Edfu, Hierakonpolis and Deir Abu Hinnes.

Update: Due to unforeseen circumstances, the Society AGM will be postponed until the January meeting, so this event is the lecture only, but we will also be having a book sale so come along and perhaps pick up a bargain for Christmas!

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EDINBURGH Dan Potter: Pow! Thwack! Khufu! When Egyptology and Superheroes Collide
Nov
4
2:30 PM14:30

EDINBURGH Dan Potter: Pow! Thwack! Khufu! When Egyptology and Superheroes Collide

Ancient Egypt is a constant inspiration for artists, filmmakers and storytellers. Academic recognition of Egyptian themes in film is well established; however, the exploration of these same themes in other media is not as fully developed. Comic books are one of the most diverse and inventive media in circulation today and they too have taken to the motifs of hieroglyphs, animal headed deities and mythology with aplomb. So what do Batman, the Fantastic Four and  Superman have to say about ancient Egypt? And what can that tell us about how ancient Egypt is perceived? 
 

Dr Daniel Potter is the Assistant Curator on the Revealing Cultures project at the National Museum of Scotland.  His PhD research focused on the Ramesside language used to describe divine interaction, and his other research interests include early Egyptology, John Garstang’s production of archaeological facsimiles and the representation of Ancient Egypt in comics. He has previously worked at the Garstang Museum of Archaeology, Liverpool, and has experience of teaching Ancient Egyptian history, religion and language, the history of archaeology and Roman material culture. He joined National Museums Scotland in September 2016.

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GLASGOW John J Johnston: Lost in Time and Space - Unrolling Egypt's Ancient Dead
Oct
7
1:45 PM13:45

GLASGOW John J Johnston: Lost in Time and Space - Unrolling Egypt's Ancient Dead

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A frequent souvenir of wealthy travellers, the mummified cadavers of ancient Egyptians were not confined merely to museums but became an increasingly popular feature of salons and lecture theatres throughout the Western world during the mid-nineteenth century. The practice of publicly ‘unrolling’ mummies has been viewed as both a ghoulish spectacle for affluent sensation seekers and as an early scientific approach to the emerging discipline of Egyptology. This lecture attempts to address this dichotomy by placing the practice within its social, cultural, and historical contexts.

John J Johnston is a freelance Egyptologist. A former Vice Chair of the Egypt Exploration Society (2010-15), he has lectured extensively throughout the UK on a diverse range of topics from gender and sexuality in the ancient world to the reception of ancient Egypt in modern popular culture. He has contributed to a wide variety of scholarly and general publications, and his introductory essay to the anthology Unearthed (Jurassic London, 2013) on the mummy as literary and cultural icon, was shortlisted for a prestigious British Science Fiction Association Award in 2014.

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Dec
3
11:00 AM11:00

GLASGOW Ian Mathieson Memorial Lecture & Egyptology Scotland 15th Anniversary: Alan Jeffreys, Angela McDonald, Bill Manley, Campbell Price

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This is a day event starting at 11am and ending at 4pm.

Mr Alan Jeffreys: '"I Will Add to Thy Days Fifteen Years": A Review of Egyptology Scotland'

Dr Angela McDonald: 'Emotion in Ancient Egypt & the Ancient Near East'

Lunch break (12.45-13.45)

Dr Bill Manley: 'Revisiting Ankhtyfy'

Dr Campbell Price: 'Senenmut redivivius: Monuments, memory and mutilation'

Entry £10 full day, £5 for morning or afternoon only.

 

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Jun
11
12:45 PM12:45

GLASGOW David Rohl: Exodus - Myth or History?

  • Rm 301, McCance Building, Strathclyde University (map)
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This is a double lecture.  Please note the earlier starting time.

David Rohl’s career as a historian has been largely spent in examining the chronology of the ancient world, including its impact upon the historicity of the Bible and the identification of the pharaohs of the Famine and Exodus. Author of A Test of Time, Legend: The Genesis of Civilisation, From Eden to Exile and The Lords of Avaris, David's lecture will cover the themes of his latest book Exodus – Myth or History?

David presents the latest findings from Avaris, which appear to indicate that the Exodus tradition was based on real events from the Middle Bronze IIA period in Egypt, when a Western Asiatic population settled in the Eastern Nile Delta, at the invitation of the state, during the late 12th Dynasty. These highly Egyptianised Semites then abandoned the city at the end of the 13th Dynasty, prior to the arrival of the Hyksos at the transition to the Middle Bronze IIB.

David then discusses past research on, and possible mechanisms for, the Yam Suph (‘Reed Sea’) crossing, before journeying through Sinai and on into the ‘Promised Land’ to explore a Middle Bronze IIB conquest of Canaan, starting with the destruction of Jericho.

There will be a book-sale and signing of David’s latest book.

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